Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

New review of book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (2017) in Ecclesiastical Law Journal

A new review of my book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (2017) in the Ecclesiastical Law Journal: ‘This book is an enjoyably spry reflection on the pitfalls of aggressive secularism and the atomistic tendencies of modern liberal individualism. Ten Napel deploys comparative legal method, interdisciplinary scholarship and social pluralist thought… Continue reading New review of book on Constitutionalism, Democracy and Religious Freedom. To Be Fully Human (2017) in Ecclesiastical Law Journal

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

Chapter in forthcoming volume on Religion, Pluralism, and Reconciling Difference

The description of the volume, edited by W. Cole Durham Jr. and Donlu Thayer, reads as follows: 'We live in an increasingly pluralized world. This sociological reality has become the irreversible destiny of humankind. Even once religiously homogeneous societies are becoming increasingly diverse. Religious freedom is modernity’s most profound if sometimes forgotten answer to the… Continue reading Chapter in forthcoming volume on Religion, Pluralism, and Reconciling Difference

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

Video Recording of Panel ‘Religion and Pluralism in a Changing World’

'The recordings of the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium, Religion and Religious FreeDom in a Changing World, held in October of 2017 are now available to view here. (...)' You can find the link to the video recording of the panel on 'religion and pluralism in a changing world' here:  https://www.iclrs.org/event.php/2017+Annual+Symposium/Media/English/3959 'Religion and Pluralism… Continue reading Video Recording of Panel ‘Religion and Pluralism in a Changing World’

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics

Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

From October 1-3, 2017, the 24th Annual International Law and Religion Symposium was held at Brigham Young University Law School in Provo, Utah, USA. The Symposium was attended by 100 participants, from 50 different countries, while interpretation at the venue was available in 11 languages (Arabic, French, Italian, Korean, Laotian, Mongolian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian,… Continue reading Paper presentation during panel on ‘Religion & Pluralism in a Changing World’, BYU Law School, Provo, Utah

Democracy, Dutch Politics

Blogpost ‘The State of Dutch Democracy: Dancing on the Deck of the Titanic?’

The state of Dutch democracy is uncertain. After last week’s elections, the stability of the political system appears guaranteed for the next couple of years. We cannot be sure, however, what will happen afterwards. This marks a change from the past. Read the whole blogpost here: http://leidenlawblog.nl/articles/the-state-of-dutch-democracy-dancing-on-the-deck-of-the-titanic.

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

Contribution to volume on ‘Rethinking Europe’s Constitution’ (2007)

'The beginnings of this book go back to 2003 when the editor asked the contributors and several others to participate in an expert meeting on the Draft Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, which at that time had just been made public. Subsequently, all went to work and towards the end of 2004 most participants… Continue reading Contribution to volume on ‘Rethinking Europe’s Constitution’ (2007)

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

Chapter in volume on Religion, Politics and Law. Philosophical Reflections on the Sources of Normative Order in Society (2009)

'Modern, liberal democracies in the West living under the rule of law and protection of human rights cannot articulate the very values from which they derive their legitimacy. These pre-political and pre-legal preconditions cannot be guaranteed, let alone be enforced by the state, but constitute nevertheless its moral and spiritual infrastructure. Until recently, a common… Continue reading Chapter in volume on Religion, Politics and Law. Philosophical Reflections on the Sources of Normative Order in Society (2009)