Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Public Theology, Religion and Politics, Whither Europe?

Author’s response to my review of “What’s Wrong with Rights?”

Last February, I had the pleasure of reviewing Prof. Nigel Biggar’s important new book. Prof. Biggar is Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology at the University of Oxford and Director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life. We met in the early stages of writing What’s Wrong with Rights when he… Continue reading Author’s response to my review of “What’s Wrong with Rights?”

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Public Theology, Religion and Politics

Essay “Is Nigel’s Biggar’s ‘What’s Wrong with Rights?’ sufficiently realistic?” on Canopy Forum

The opening paragraph of the essay reads as follows: "What’s Wrong with Rights is a superb book. If there is one subject that lends itself to interdisciplinary research, it is that of human rights. To the extent that lawyers have ever been able to claim a monopoly, those days are now well behind us. In this… Continue reading Essay “Is Nigel’s Biggar’s ‘What’s Wrong with Rights?’ sufficiently realistic?” on Canopy Forum

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Dutch Politics, Law and Religion, Public Theology, Religion and Politics

‘An Encouraging Trend in Dutch Scholarship’

The latest issue of Ecclesiastical Law Journal contains a review of a recent book by my colleague Sophie van Bijsterveld, who is Professor of Religion, Law, and Society at Radboud University in Nijmegen. The opening paragraph of the review reads as follows: 'State and Religion: re-assessing a mutual relationship is a spry and engaging contribution to… Continue reading ‘An Encouraging Trend in Dutch Scholarship’

Comparative Constitutional Law, Democracy, Law and Religion, Religion and Politics

Commentator, Conference on ‘Religion, Rights, and Institutions’, Princeton University (2014)

'The Conference on Religions, Rights, and Institutions will focus on how institutional design, of both religions and political regimes, affects the relationship between religious practice and activity and human rights. It will examine how the internal organization (formal and informal structures and rules) of religions and religious communities affect therights of members of religious communities… Continue reading Commentator, Conference on ‘Religion, Rights, and Institutions’, Princeton University (2014)